MODERN JEWISH HISTORY

PERIODICALS & NEWSPAPERS COLLECTION


153 ITEMS  |  0% DIGITIZED  |  0% CATALOGED

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DESCRIPTION

The holdings consist of intermittent issues of four Russian-language and one Yiddish-language Jewish periodicals published between 1899 and 1948.

DATES

1890s–1940s

PROVENANCE

The collection was acquired in 2004–2005 from an anonymous ephemera dealer. 

DETAILS

“Buduschnost’” (The future). Russian-language Jewish scientific-literary weekly periodical edited and published by Semen Osipovich Gruzenberg. There are three annual bound volumes between 1900 and 1902. 

“Evreyskaya Nedelya” (Jewish week). Russian-language weekly newspaper published by I. Ansheles and I. Zeligman in Moscow, Russia. Topics include the Duma and legislation of the Russian Empire pertaining to the Jews, World War I, Jews in the war, Jewish refugees, Jewish aid, international reporting on Jewish affairs, and literary reviews of Jewish media and fiction. Holdings intermittent from May 24, 1915, to December 4, 1916.

“Evreyskaya Zhizn” (Jewish life). Russian-language weekly newspaper published in Moscow. This Zionist literary publication was launched in July 1915 after the closing of the St. Petersburg newspaper “Rassvet” (Dawn) in June 1915. In spite of censorship, the publication sought to promote Jewish culture. Holdings intermittent from 1915 to 1916.

“Noviy Voskhod” (New sunrise). Russian-language weekly newspaper that replaced the leading periodical of Russian Jewry, “Voskhod” (Sunrise), which closed in 1906 partly due to censorship conflicts. “Noviy Voskhod” was started in 1910 and was closed by the authorities in 1915. Holdings intermittent from 1911 to 1915.

“Eynikayt” (Unity). Yiddish-language newspaper with variable print frequency. “Eynikayt” was the official publication of the Jewish Anti-Fascist Committee in the Soviet Union. It was published from June 1942 until November 1948 and edited first by Shakne Epshtein and later by G. Zhits. Its aim was to bring together Soviet and world Jewry to support the Soviet war effort. Holdings intermittent from 1944 and 1948.